DOES STEPHANIE HAVE WHAT IT TAKES?

See why Stephanie has what is takes by learning more about her education, advocacy, and City of Shawnee experience.

By providing your email you are agreeing to receive periodic emails from Meyer for Mayor.

GET IN

THE LOOP.

Advance the future for Shawnee by showing your support to Stephanie for Shawnee; sign up for our newsletter, today.

Paid for by Stephanie Meyer for Shawnee, Sam Hawkins, Treasurer.

(913) 626-5916

  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Black Twitter Icon
  • Black LinkedIn Icon
  • Black Instagram Icon

Strategic growth

Shawnee has fallen behind our peer cities in commercial and residential growth. This not only limits our local dining, shopping, and employment opportunities, but also means that residential property owners are forced to shoulder much more of the burden than in other cities. 

as your mayor, what will i do about it?

Growing our business base is the only sustainable means of lowering our residential property taxes, while maintaining quality services. 

 

Currently, only about 25% of the city’s revenue comes from commercial taxes, putting much of the cost of government on the shoulders of our residents. This is an unsustainable model and will be further exacerbated as our vast infrastructure continues to age. 

 

As mayor, I would work to bring additional businesses to our city to better balance this responsibility, while also providing a more vibrant, attractive place to live, work, and play with more high-quality restaurant, retail, and employment opportunities.

Shawnee has largely avoided regional conversations on economic development, and that means when potential employers look at the metro, we’re not on their minds.

 

We must change that and give Shawnee a seat at the regional table—by playing an active role and not being afraid to compete. We’ve got a great story to tell, and we should be telling it to folks outside of our city limits.

 

I believe there are three areas of Shawnee that present that most opportunity: our downtown, the youth sports corridor along Johnson Drive, and our growing industrial region near K-7. We should be actively promoting these areas, and the mayor should be playing a meaningful part in those conversations—particularly along Nieman, which has struggled with the lengthy construction, and where we’ve got one of the metro’s only federal opportunity zones.

The city’s comprehensive plan—the document that helps to guide development in Shawnee—has not been significantly updated since 1987.

 

This puts us at a competitive disadvantage, creates challenges when considering development, and causes uncertainty for our residents. 

Until we know where we want to go and develop a modernized and responsive plan to get there, we can never truly make progress. 

 

As mayor, I would work hand in hand with development experts, city staff, and residents to create a plan that not only leverages our unique advantages, but arms current residents with the facts about their neighborhood’s future potential.

 

safe streets

Public safety and infrastructure are the most important functions of local government and will always be a top priority for me.

what, as your mayor, will i do about it?

1

action one:

Keep Shawnee Safe.

We’ve made important investments in our fire and police departments during my six years in office, but we must continue the work to ensure that our excellent public safety staff have the tools they need to meet the changing demands of the future.

 

This includes working to fully eliminate police “blackout” periods and putting together a plan to address the aging Fire Station 71, as well as the growing demands on fire presence in the northeast corner of our city.

 

In 2016, Johnson County voters approved a ten-year, quarter-cent sales tax to pay for the cost of a new courthouse, and by statute, a portion of that increase goes to every municipality within the county limits. I strongly believed then, as I do now, that while not required, the entirety of that increase should be allocated to public safety needs, following the spirit of the ballot measure, and I will fight to ensure that remains the case.

2

action two:

Improve our Aging Infrastructure.

Shawnee is a geographically wide city with more than 780 lane miles to maintain. These roads, much like our stormwater pipes, are aging and in need of repair. We’ve made progress with the dedicated sales tax to parks, pipes, and payment, but there is more to be done.

 

While some have suggested cutting our city budget to the bone to fully fund these priorities, decimating many of the reasons residents moved to Shawnee and eroding our quality of life, I believe there’s a better way.

 

Growing our commercial tax base, while broadening our overall revenue, is the only sustainable means of funding these needs, while also maintaining the quality services our residents expect and not further increasing the burden to residential property owners. Additionally, we should look to allocate a portion of that growth specifically to these unmet needs. 

 

safe streets

Public safety and infrastructure are the most important functions of local government and will always be a top priority for me.

as your mayor, what will i do about it?

We’ve made important investments in our fire and police departments during my six years in office, but we must continue the work to ensure that our excellent public safety staff have the tools they need to meet the changing demands of the future.

 

This includes working to fully eliminate police “blackout” periods and putting together a plan to address the aging Fire Station 71, as well as the growing demands on fire presence in the northeast corner of our city.

 

In 2016, Johnson County voters approved a ten-year, quarter-cent sales tax to pay for the cost of a new courthouse, and by statute, a portion of that increase goes to every municipality within the county limits. I strongly believed then, as I do now, that while not required, the entirety of that increase should be allocated to public safety needs, following the spirit of the ballot measure, and I will fight to ensure that remains the case.

Shawnee is a geographically wide city with more than 780 lane miles to maintain. These roads, much like our stormwater pipes, are aging and in need of repair. We’ve made progress with the dedicated sales tax to parks, pipes, and payment, but there is more to be done.

 

While some have suggested cutting our city budget to the bone to fully fund these priorities, decimating many of the reasons residents moved to Shawnee and eroding our quality of life, I believe there’s a better way.

 

Growing our commercial tax base, while broadening our overall revenue, is the only sustainable means of funding these needs, while also maintaining the quality services our residents expect and not further increasing the burden to residential property owners. Additionally, we should look to allocate a portion of that growth specifically to these unmet needs. 

For as long as I can remember, providing curbs and guttering to the areas of Shawnee lacking this basic infrastructure has been a common topic. Some figures estimate that this would take as much as $154 million, and many decades to accomplish, so the governing body has yet to take this on in a meaningful way.

 

Just because it would be a challenge does not mean it isn't the right thing to do. While this obviously could not be accomplished overnight, the city should work with these established neighborhoods to identify resident demand, and begin putting together a long-term plan to meet these needs.

 

Once a community plan is developed, it should be readily and easily accessible to the public, so our residents finally have the ability to see exactly when their street will be improved, providing long-overdue transparency and stability.

 

STRONG COMMUNITY

Shawnee is a unique and wonderful place to live, work, and raise a family, and future planning should preserve and enhance this.

as your mayor, what will i do about it?

It is absolutely possible to allow for strategic growth, while maintaining the quality of life that we all love here in Shawnee.

 

As mayor, I would be committed to ensuring that all of the amazing things we love about our community remain, as we pursue opportunities to diversify our tax base to lower the burden on residential homeowners.

 

An important and overlooked component in this long-term planning. Our city’s comprehensive plan has not been updated since 1987. This means that as the city has grown, we’ve been operating on the fly to accommodate it, which can lead to less-than-desirable results. We must come together to create a plan that allows for strategic growth, while maintaining - and enhancing! - our existing quality of life.

Our parks and recreation facilities and programming are what initially drew my husband and me to Shawnee, and it remains one of my favorite things about our city.

 

While some candidates favor cutting these programs, or halting growth (or even maintenance) in order to slash government to the bone, I believe that they are an integral part in what makes our city what it is today, and would work to preserve and expand these assets.

 

And of course, no conversation on parks and recreation would be complete without a mention of the recent community center vote. Regardless of the outcome, and the heated dialogue on both sides of the issue, it is time to come together as a city and determine what’s next for that both that location, and our facilities overall. Is it an outdoor pool? Expansion of the civic center? Addition of bike trails on our eastern side...none of the above? All of the above? We should be having this important community conversation, and not taking advantage of the recent 46% turnout is a wasted opportunity.

We’re fortunate here in Shawnee to have two wonderful school districts, and while not technically a part of city government, having a strong working relationship is vitally important to the overall success of our community.

 

As a proud public school graduate, and the daughter-in-law of two retired public school educators, I know how vital our public schools are to future success (and hope to have my own children there someday!). 

 

As mayor, I would work to further strengthen these ties, while looking for additional opportunities to partner for the betterment of Shawnee.